“I am feeling great, should I still come in to get an adjustment?”

If I feel good, do I still need to come in for an adjustment

Just heard from someone, “I am feeling great, should I still come in to get an adjustment?”

I realized what a great opportunity to help someone understand how this chiropractor functions.

Here was my answer:

“that’s the million dollar question. If you’re subluxated (misalignment of the spine) I can detect it and ‘adjust’ it. Symptoms of a subluxation may not be recognized by you but it does effect your health.”

He kept his appointment.

I can cure …

I’ll bet most people would love for me to finish that statement.  It’s been exactly that kind of message that has catapulted chiropractic into the hearts of our advocates and the minds of our detractors. Did you know that over 100 years ago chiropractic began as a profession when D.D. Palmer “cured” Harvey Lillard of his deafness?  Today, most people think of chiropractic as a form of therapy for their back problems. There are many chiropractors today that claim they can treat all kinds of things and that their technique is unique (there are many different techniques within the chiropractic profession, some that are about how to adjust the spine and some that are about where or when to adjust the spine).

I feel sorry for the public that is trying to decipher the best approach to being healthy – traditional versus alternative – much less as to which chiropractic technique to choose.  When it comes to chiropractic I do know this … no one is the same and therefore no two individuals will heal exactly the same. Some techniques may be more effective with some people who have xyz condition, but not with abc condition. If any kind of doctor had the cure for a condition, each and every time the condition was expressed in any patient that expressed it, then that doctor would be famous, world renown, and I believe the condition would be eradicated. Has that happened?

There have been many patients that have had relief and cure from the conditions they sought treatment for as a result of chiropractic adjustments of the spine … and there are those that have had less than relief. In my experience of nearly 30 years, I have come to the realization that most people have a greater ability to overcome conditions when they do healthy things that keep their body in top notch shape. One of those healthy things is keeping the communication between the brain and the rest of the body clear from interference … and isn’t that what chiropractic is about?

It’s cool to see a Chiropractor

I recently read an article about how it’s cool to be healthy. I couldn’t agree more. Only thing is, there wasn’t a mention of chiropractic in there.  I’ve been practicing and living my life with the emphasis on  natural health. My view is that of a wheel with the center (or the hub) being chiropractic and the spokes being all the things that one does to be on the road to health. Those spokes include nutrition, exercise, attitude, rest, avoidance of obvious unhealthy things such as smoking etc. There’s more but you get the idea. So, why is there such a rift between healthy things and chiropractic.  We chiropractors have been boxed into this back pain corner that it is stifling. I am constantly trying to get out of that box, but it seems that it is a never ending challenge.

I can tell you that a lot of the people that come to see me are cool. Many of them are doing healthy things (using the spokes of the wheel). They care about their health and, most importantly, they are taking the initiative to do things responsibly because they want to avoid the alternative. What’s the alternative to responsible healthy activity?  Maybe it’s waiting around until you get sick.

What does my new sign say about me?

New sign1

I recently put up this new sign at the office. It has been in the making for the past six months. The delay in actually putting it up … is me! You see, I feel conflicted about it. Here’s why:

For most of my career as a chiropractor, I utilized therapies that were added in for various reasons. Therapies to relax, rehabilitate, or help the patient “feel” better. I also accepted insurances, primarily, because I didn’t think that people would pay for care out of pocket. About 10 years ago, I went cold turkey and stopped offering therapies, and no longer accepted insurance. This allowed me to focus on what Chiropractic is about, that is, locating and correcting vertebral subluxations in order to allow the body to work better.

I believe that I can do the most good for a person by offering them what I do best, which is the determination of whether that person has a subluxation and then correcting it. After much consideration, I realize that most people are driven to a chiropractor due to what seems to be bothering them at the time, as opposed to wanting to seek chiropractic care as part of their wellness program (if they even have one).

By putting up a sign that associates Chiropractic with the treatment of “back and pain” (or any condition) in contrast to what I believe to be Chiropractic’s most important message, that chiropractic helps you achieve an optimum level of health by reducing interference to the major communication system of the body, am I confusing people as to the value of Chiropractic?

What do you think?

What do you expect from Chiropractic?

After being in practice for almost 30 years I am still amazed at two things. First of all, I still love doing what I do – helping people. Second, I continue to spin my wheels when it comes to motivating people to make chiropractic a priority in their journey toward optimum health.  When people are in pain and they have benefited from chiropractic care, the assumption, obviously, is chiropractic was an effective treatment for their pain. This seems logical since many people get relief from their pain while receiving chiropractic care. Most people have been led to believe or EXPECT, from an early age, that we only go to the doctor when we are sick or in pain and only when we “feel” better are we finished with care. When someone is receiving chiropractic care and the chiropractor meets the persons “expectations”… well, they stop coming in. So what do I do?  Stop meeting their expectations?  Not exactly.